bevfollowsthechild

Just another WordPress.com site

Independence – what does it look like in your child? September 22, 2013

This month the teachers and I have been focusing on  the development of independence in our children.  In the upcoming newsletter we will soon publish, we have included examples of what independence looks like in a two year old, all the way up to our big six year olds, and how the Montessori environment supports the development of independence.

1236966_10153234415175268_1551954637_n

When I saw this photograph, as part of a whole sequence of photographs taken by my daughter on a recent backpacking trip, I began to think about what independence looks like in adults.  I have three adult children, aged mid-twenties to early thirties, all Montessori school graduates.  They are all strong independent thinkers, enjoying a good debate, whether in a class or around the kitchen table.  Independence means you are not a follower.

My middle child is an avid explorer, enjoying backpacking in the wilderness, and traveling independently within the USA and abroad.  She is a confident traveler, whether by foot, bike, kayak, and just recently, by sailing.  Aware of her environment, respectful of the weather, animals, other people, she is confident of her skills.  That’s all part of independence – respect, awareness and confidence.

Of course, just like parents of younger children, independence in our children can cause us anxiety!  I worry about my child getting into difficulties on the Pacific Crest Trail, just as you worry when you see your child handling a knife, or scissors, or carrying a real glass.  We don’t want our children to get hurt.  But trust me, our children are capable of so much, and by giving them the gift of independence, we encourage them to live their lives to their full potential.

Advertisements
 

Repetition September 12, 2013

Filed under: Repetition — bevfollowsthechild @ 9:03 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

Parents ask the best questions!

“My daughter keeps bringing home the same work.  Is that okay?”

This parent has noticed a key concept of Montessori education – the desire in the child for repetition.

Do you remember your child learning how to walk?  No matter how many times he or she fell down, your child persevered until walking was mastered.   There was a lot of repetition!

That’s the same attitude that makes your child want to persevere and repeat cutting work, or counting to 100, or tracing his or her name.  Your child will repeat the work until it is mastered.  Once a child reaches mastery, the work no longer is interesting or appealing, and the child’s attention moves on to a new activity.

We still go through the same process when we are older.  Learning to drive a car takes a lot of repetition, for example.  If we try to learn a new skill, such as surfing, playing the guitar, playing tennis, we would find that one lesson and one practice session is just not enough for us to master the new skill.  And, with any new activity that is appealing to us, we would be excited to practice, to try and try again, and to work towards improving our skills.  For our children, there are so many activities that are new and exciting, and they will practice these activities over and over again.  Just watch them grow and improve!

Parents – please do post a question and I’ll do my best to answer.  I bet other parents are wondering about the same concepts as you.